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1451-2 Ludwig van Beethoven: Two Faces of the Violin Concerto
[TNC CD 1451-2]
$14.00
by Professional Reviews Date Added: Jan 09, 2005
The major attraction of this set is its combination of Beethoven's familiar Violin Concerto with the composer's own arrangement of it as a concerto for piano… I believe this marks only the second time that the two versions have been issued together in a single set. Two key features lend Beethoven's piano arrangement certain interest. For one, it underscores how remarkably violinistic his original is… Ironically, although the composer left no cadenzas for his original work, he provided three (one for each movement) for the piano adaptation. All are interesting, the exceptionally long one for the-first movement calling for obbligato timpani that echoes (and in a sense develops) the work's opening measures. And as another point of interest, many may find it instructive to hear how a master does what is probably the best transcription possible of a work not pianistically conceived. I have not heard any of the accounts listed in Schwann, but this one is certainly acceptable. If it lacks some of the subtlety and nuance of the (long unavailable) Peter Serkin-Ozawa collaboration, it remains unmannered and musical.

So, too, with the performance of the violin version. Here the special interest may rest with the soloist's playing of the three cadenzas Beethoven wrote for the piano version in arrangements made (according to the insert notes) by L. Bulatow. Indeed, the second movement's cadenza counts as more than a mere arrangement, Bulatow having included a loud echo of the timpani intrusions Beethoven employed for the cadenza in the first movement. Aside from a few breath pauses--most noticeable in the finale--the playing is straightforward and unaffected. Still, for most collectors, the main attraction for this release will probably rest with its focus on the less familiar aspects of this familiar masterpiece. Throughout both performances, the sound is first-rate…

Mortimer H. Frank
FANFARE, July/August 2002

Rating: 4 of 5 Stars! [4 of 5 Stars!]
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Oleh Krysa on Violin and Tatiana Tchekina on Piano - SALE!
Oleh Krysa on Violin and Tatiana Tchekina on Piano - SALE!
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